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1890 US Federal Census Data Waterville
Data extracted by the Colby Jewish History Project (2012)





Jews in Waterville in 1890


DMJ ID Surnamefirst nameagenative/foreign bornstreetwardpage #total Jews: 38-47 
33377BlumenthalE.55fAppleton 13  
33378BlumenthalHelen50f  13  
33379BlumenthalSarah21n  13  
33382BlumenthalBertha17n  13  
COL117BlumenthalHerman9n  13  
17750DelinskiAbram26fGilman Block 55 There was a Jewish Deletetsky in Lewiston-Auburn at the period
COL118DelinskiAnnie27fGilman Block 55 There was a Jewish Deletetsky in Lewiston-Auburn at the period
17751DelinskiEsther6fGilman Block 55 There was a Jewish Deletetsky in Lewiston-Auburn at the period
COL115GallertMark42 Silver 84 no independent evidence that Gallerts were Jewish
COL119GallertRebecca35 Silver 84 no independent evidence that Gallerts were Jewish
COL120GallertJacob17 Silver 84 no independent evidence that Gallerts were Jewish
COL121GallertSigbert15 Silver 85 no independent evidence that Gallerts were Jewish
COL122GallertMiriam13 Silver 85 no independent evidence that Gallerts were Jewish
COL123GallertAimee10 Silver 85 no independent evidence that Gallerts were Jewish
36505GallertDavid49 Pleasant 86 no independent evidence that Gallerts were Jewish
36414GallertMrs. Rosalia46 Pleasant 86 no independent evidence that Gallerts were Jewish
36054GallertSolomon22nPleasant 86 no independent evidence that Gallerts were Jewish
36405GallertSigismond20nPleasant 86 no independent evidence that Gallerts were Jewish
36489GallertFannie18nPleasant 86 no independent evidence that Gallerts were Jewish
COL116GallertBenno16nPleasant 86 no independent evidence that Gallerts were Jewish
36424GallertMinnie13nPleasant 86 no independent evidence that Gallerts were Jewish
36491GallertErnest10nPleasant 86 no independent evidence that Gallerts were Jewish
COL124GallertDaisy7nPleasant 86 no independent evidence that Gallerts were Jewish
COL125GoldsmithR.19n  87not Jewish? 
17757LeivinWilliam24fTemple 129Levine! 
17756LeivinSarah18fTemple 129  
COL126LeivinJohn12fTemple 129  
36515LeivinAnnie Eva0nTemple 130 2W.
COL127LeivinAnnie26fTemple 130  
COL128MorrisonSolomon25fAlden 147  
17759MorrisonMrs. Fannie25fAlden 147 immigrated from Russia
COL129MorrisonAnnie3nAlden1147  
COL130MorrisonDavid0 Alden 147 6w
COL131MillerMorris23fAlden? 147  
COL132MillerAbram17fAlden? 147  
COL133MarshallLouis30fNew Cross St. from Alden 147not Jewish?no independent evidence that Gallerts were Jewish
COL134MarshallMrs. Dora27fNew Cross St. from Alden 147not Jewish?no independent evidence that Gallerts were Jewish
COL135MarshallMary6fNew Cross St. from Alden 147not Jewish?no independent evidence that Gallerts were Jewish
COL136Marshall[blank]4 New Cross St. from Alden 147not Jewish?no independent evidence that Gallerts were Jewish
COL137Marshall[blank]3 New Cross St. from Alden 147not Jewish?no independent evidence that Gallerts were Jewish
COL138Marshall[blank]1 New Cross St. from Alden 147not Jewish?no independent evidence that Gallerts were Jewish
COL139RabishawJohn24fMain 202not Jewish?no independent evidence that Gallerts were Jewish
COL140RabishawAdolph20fMain 202not Jewish?no independent evidence that Rabishaws were Jewish
COL141RozinskiL50fGilman Block 202 no independent evidence that Rabishaws were Jewish
36301SteinbergHannah40n  221 no independent evidence that Steinbergs were Jewish
36300SteinbergIsadore38f  221 no independent evidence that Steinbergs were Jewish
36298SteinbergBernard14n  221 no independent evidence that Steinbergs were Jewish
        total population: 7616; total school children: 2611 
          
 Waterville Maine Census of 1890, Taconnett Falls Chapter of the Maine Geneology Society, April 1988 [source: handwritten census at Waterville Public Library]        
 Maine State Library 974.1 tW33wa 1988   MHS Mv W 319.6   

Methodological notes :

This data was culled from the original U.S. census manuscripts, as found on www.ancestry.com.
Jews are understood to constitute an ethnic group of Eastern and Central European origin characterized by common names and occupational pursuits, as well as a distinctive language.
This definition lends itself well to analysis of the data preserved in census records.
Two primary methods were used to identify Jews:
1. Individuals born abroad whose mother tongue is "Yiddish," "Jewish," or "Hebrew" were automatically included in the spreadsheet, as were all members of their families.
2. For individuals born abroad whose mother tongue was another Eastern or Central European language (e.g., Russian, Polish, German), or individuals born in the U.S. with one or more parents from Eastern or Central Europe, we examined surnames, given names within a household, and occupations in light of common Jewish characteristics. This method of analysis is, of course, subject to inaccuracy, as we may have excluded Jews with uncommon names or occupations or included non-Jews whose characteristics appear Jewish. Individuals listed with the annotation "nj?" in the far right-hand column are those whose Jewish ancestry is plausible but questionable.
This method of analysis easily misses Jewish households whose members' parents were all born in the United States. In 1930 Maine, however, such households were quite rare. Special efforts were made to identify households of this nature in Portland, where they constituted less than 1% of identified Jewish households.
All members of a household containing a Jew are included in the spreadsheet, with the exception of Jewish lodgers and servants, who are listed individually. Household members who are evidently not Jewish (such as non-Jewish servants and some spouses or in-laws) are listed with the annotation "nj."
Information on place of birth
Some people replied with the name of the place when they left; others replied with the name of place when the census was taken; in other cases it just seems that it was easier for the census taker to write ‘Russia’ rather than Lithuania, Ukraine or other unfamiliar country names.
And there is another reason to be skeptical of the accuracy of the place of birth information. Immigrants from the Pale had a very justified fear of the Russian and often local governments. One way to manage this reality was to tell government representatives what they expected they wanted to hear or what they thought would bring them the least trouble. This may well explain why a number of family members, who were clearly from Eastern Europe, may have answered ‘Maine’ or ‘New York’.

Last Updated : Jan 2 , 2021

Thank you to the Colby College Maine Jewish History Project (2011) and David M. Freidenreich for the information